Archives de catégorie : Expositions/Exhibitions

Et 1917 devient Révolution… / Paris / 18 octobre 2017 – 18 février 2018

Hôtel national des Invalides / organisée par la Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine (BDIC)

Une exposition événement

Des documents uniques – affiches, tracts, films, photographies, presse illustrée, objets collectés à chaud pendant les événements permettent de comprendre comment 1917 devient « révolution », bouleversant l’univers politique, économique, social de millions d’hommes, de femmes et d’enfants en Russie, puis dans le monde entier. L’ année 1917 en Russie a été revisitée depuis une vingtaine d’années par de nouvelles recherches historiques s’appuyant sur des archives inédites – intimes, iconographiques et audiovisuelles, notamment. C’est toute la complexité de l’événement qui sera restituée grâce au patrimoine exceptionnel de la BDIC et des institutions partenaires en France, Russie et Géorgie.

  Continuer la lecture de Et 1917 devient Révolution… / Paris / 18 octobre 2017 – 18 février 2018

Malevich, Kandinsky and revolutionary porcelain : Russian masterpieces of art and white gold from 1917 to 1927 / Basel / April 22 – October 8 2017

Spielzeug Welten Museum Basel 

Russian porcelain of the period from 1917 to 1927 reflects the dramatic changes in Russian life at the time. Wholly unique, thematically contemporary decorations are typical. Having emerged in the atmosphere of the Russian Revolution, this white gold of the 1920s was used for more than just propaganda and didactic purposes. In a period dominated by industrial design, many outstanding artists turned to this as the art form most likely to reach the broad masses. Technically superb craftsmen modelled their creations after designs by the artists. This combination yielded amazingly beautiful, never-before-seen porcelain pieces that were often only made as one-offs or in small series.

Continuer la lecture de Malevich, Kandinsky and revolutionary porcelain : Russian masterpieces of art and white gold from 1917 to 1927 / Basel / April 22 – October 8 2017

Мода и Революция / Москва / 5 апреля — 21 мая

Музей Москвы

Москва 100 лет назад – город великих потрясений и перемен. Первая мировая война, революция 1917 года, возвращение статуса столицы, эпоха военного коммунизма, сменившаяся НЭПом, – эти события не только стали важнейшими переломными моментами в истории России, но и нашли отражение во всех сферах жизни, в том числе в городской повседневности. Выставка «Москва. Мода и Революция» наглядно демонстрирует динамику изменений в стиле одежды и в быту, которые повлекла за собой революция. Для того чтобы экспозиция была более полной, за ее основу взяли временной период 1907-1927 гг., равный десяти годам до и десяти годам после 1917 года.

Continuer la lecture de Мода и Революция / Москва / 5 апреля — 21 мая

Les Révolutions russes vues de France 1917-1967

Musée de l’Histoire vivante / Montreuil /  29 avril – 31 décembre 2017

Nous avons choisi de proposer au public une exposition qui s’intéresse plus à la réception des Révolutions russes en France qu’au « récit révolutionnaire » des événements des années 1905 à 1917 et de poursuivre jusqu’en 1967 sur les anniversaires des Révolutions.

Continuer la lecture de Les Révolutions russes vues de France 1917-1967

The Future Remains: Revisiting Revolution

Calvert 22 Foundation (In partnership with the State Hermitage Museum, the European University at St Petersburg and UCL SSEES, Supported by the Vladimir Potanin Foundation ) / A season of events marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution / February – December 2017  / London

To mark the centenary of the “ten days that shook the world”, Calvert 22 Foundation will reflect on the nature of revolution and of writing history itself. Both an undisputable turning point and one of the most contested events in modern history, with some questioning its very position as a revolution, the events in Russia in 1917, from February to October and beyond, have been endlessly mythologised. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Calvert 22 Foundation will be hosting a year-long season of events, exhibitions and discussions to uncover new perspectives on the events of 1917 and their consequences.

Continuer la lecture de The Future Remains: Revisiting Revolution

La Révolution de 1917. La Russie et la Suisse

Musée national Zurich (en collaboration avec le Deutsches Historisches Museum de Berlin / du 24 février au 25 juin 2017

À l’occasion du centenaire de la Révolution russe, une exposition temporaire présentée dans la nouvelle aile du Musée national Zurich se penche sur les relations entre la Suisse et la Russie dans une période riche en bouleversements. À l’aide de photographies, de documents, d’objets d’art et de tableaux, elle évoque l’histoire de la Russie à cette époque et ses répercussions en Suisse, en retraçant l’étonnante imbrication des liens entre deux pays fort différents.

Plus d’infromation et le dossier de presse

Liberty and Revolution: Russia 1917 Revisited

British Library / April – September 2017

This landmark exhibition will examine the conditions and events that led to the Revolution and illustrate how subsequent political, economic, social, cultural and artistic aspects of life in Russia and the Soviet Union were shaped by the Revolution and its consequences.

The exhibition will also reveal how the Russian Revolution was viewed in other countries, with a special emphasis on Great Britain, and how the history of the whole world in the 20th century was shaped by this event. On show will be unique and rarely seen materials held in the British Library including posters, manuscripts, sounds, maps and postcards. The exhibition will also display many extraordinary items on loan from Russia, many leaving the country for the first time including artworks, uniforms, memorabilia and artefacts.

More information

Café Pittoresque / Contemporary Fine Arts / Berlin

 Exhibition “Café Pittoresque”

Contemporary Fine Arts

5 november – 17 décembre 2016

 

Selected works by Georg Baselitz, Albert Oehlen, Georg Herold, Norbert Schwontkowski, Katja Strunz, TAL R, and Gert & Uwe Tobias, as well as historic works by Wladimir Majakowski, Amshei Niurenberg, Mikhail Tscheremnych, Pyotr Galadshev, El Lissitsky, Valentina Nikiforova Kulagina-Klucis, Alexander Michailowitsch Rodchenko, Abram Sterenberg, and the Moscow WChUTEMAS- school.

During a discussion about the work Rodchenko I, Rodchenko II by Albert Oehlen (1982) – now a central work of this presentation – the idea of an exhibition to mark the forthcoming 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 was developed in cooperation with Wilhelm Schürmann.

The radical artistic innovations that came with this revolution remain relevant to this day. Constructivism, Suprematism, and Agitprop are formally inscribed into many contemporary works of art. The utopias and ideals of the Russian Revolution and its artistic achievements, however, where subject to considerable friction losses caused by the history of the past century, and they can no longer withstand a “post-idealist” gaze. This is evident in the shown contemporary works in many different ways, even where the engagement with the Russian avant-garde may not have been the explicit motivation of the artists.

 

More information

Revolution : Russian Art 1917–1932

Royal Academy of Arts, London

11 February — 17 April 2017

 

One hundred years on from the Russian Revolution, this powerful exhibition explores one of the most momentous periods in modern world history through the lens of its groundbreaking art.

Renowned artists including Kandinsky, Malevich, Chagall and Rodchenko were among those to live through the fateful events of 1917, which ended centuries of Tsarist rule and shook Russian society to its foundations. Amidst the tumult, the arts initially thrived as debates swirled over what form a new “people’s” art should take. But the optimism was not to last: by the end of 1932, Stalin’s brutal suppression had drawn the curtain down on creative freedom. Taking inspiration from a remarkable exhibition shown in Russia just before Stalin’s clampdown, we will mark the historic centenary by focusing on the 15-year period between 1917 and 1932 when possibilities seemed limitless and Russian art flourished across every medium.This far-ranging exhibition will – for the first time – survey the entire artistic landscape of post-Revolutionary Russia, encompassing Kandinsky’s boldly innovative compositions, the dynamic abstractions of Malevich and the Suprematists, and the emergence of Socialist Realism, which would come to define Communist art as the only style accepted by the regime.We will also include photography, sculpture, filmmaking by pioneers such as Eisenstein, and evocative propaganda posters from what was a golden era for graphic design. The human experience will be brought to life with a full-scale recreation of an apartment designed for communal living, and with everyday objects ranging from ration coupons and textiles to brilliantly original Soviet porcelain.Revolutionary in their own right, together these works capture both the idealistic aspirations and the harsh reality of the Revolution and its aftermath.

More information

A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde / MOMA / New-York

MOMA, New-York

December 3, 2016–March 12, 2017

 

Bringing together major works from MoMA’s extraordinary collection, the exhibition features breakthrough projects in painting, drawing, sculpture, prints, book and graphic design, film, photography, and architecture by leading figures such as Alexandra Exter, Natalia Goncharova, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Lyubov Popova, Alexandr Rodchenko, Olga Rozanova, Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, and Dziga Vertov, among others.

In anticipation of the centennial of the Russian Revolution, this exhibition examines key developments and new modes of abstraction, including Suprematism and Constructivism, as well as avant-garde poetry, film, and photomontage. The remarkable sense of creative urgency, radical cross-fertilization, and synthesis within the visual arts—and the aspirations among the Russian avant-garde to affect unprecedented sociopolitical transformation—wielded an influence on art production in the 20th century that reverberates throughout the course of modern history.

More information